Bloomsbury Summer School (text)

Fascinated by ancient civilisations?

We offer anyone with any level of knowledge, inspiring short courses on ancient Egypt and other areas of the ancient world.

2022 SPRING AND SUMMER COURSES

Printed course programme cover

Download a PDF of the BSS 2022 Brochure

To receive a paper copy, email your postal address to: bloomsbury@egyptology-uk.com

Spring course list

Saturday 19 March
A TASTE OF HIEROGLYPHS

Saturday 19 to Sunday 20 and Saturday 26 to Sunday 27 March
GODS, TEMPLES, AND PALACES: AN OVERVIEW OF MESOAMERICAN ARCHITECTURE

Saturday 26 to Sunday 27 March
BEL MASRI: EGYPTIAN ARABIC FOR THE TRAVELLER

Saturday 28 to Sunday 29 May
INTRODUCTION TO OLD PERSIAN: THE LANGUAGE AND SCRIPT OF THE ACHAEMENIDS

Saturday 28 to Sunday 29 May NEW!
THE OBELISKS OF THE CAESARS: A READING CLASS OF ROMAN HIEROGLYPHS

Saturday 19 March

This is a 1-day spring course that will be held online via Zoom
- a video recording will be available afterwards.

A TASTE OF HIEROGLYPHS

Course Director: Dr Bill Manley (University of Glasgow)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

For those of you intrigued by learning how to read hieroglyphs and perhaps wondering whether to take the plunge, this 1-day course will show you the basics behind reading ancient Egyptian and also give you a taste of the way we do things at Bloomsbury Summer School.

'A Taste of Hieroglyphs' assumes you have no prior experience in the subject but, through a series of presentations and reading sessions, we will show you how to read some pharaonic monuments on display in world-famous museums by the end of the day.

Course Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £30 per person
Recommended reading

It would be a good idea on the day (but not essential) to have with you a copy of:
Collier, M. and Manley, B (ideally the 2003 revised edition but the earlier edition is fine). How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs. British Museum Press.


If you are interested to go on to take our 1-week courses 'Hieroglyphs for Beginners' (running 13 – 17 June) and 'Hieroglyphs: The Next Step' (running in 2023), then you should be aware that this book is essential for both those courses.

Saturday 26 to Sunday 27 March

This is a 2-day spring course that will be held online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

BEL MASRI: EGYPTIAN ARABIC FOR THE TRAVELLER

Course Director: Dr Heba Abd el Gawad (University College London)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

Have you ever wished you could chat with your Egyptian taxi driver or bargain in the suq in colloquial Egyptian? Have you struggled to get along in Egypt with your Modern Standard Arabic phrasebook or dictionary? If so, this course is for you!

Tailored for those planning travel to Egypt, you will learn common words and key phrases in colloquial Egyptian to help you navigate various practical and social situations. Your Course Director will introduce you to her mother tongue through examples drawn from Egyptian cinema, television, and song lyrics.

The course is suitable for the absolute beginner or those looking to refresh their spoken Egyptian.

Course Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £110 per person
Recommended reading

This course is based on handouts specially prepared for BSS. However, we recommend that you bring a copy of the following with you:
Jenkins, S. (2014) Egyptian Arabic Phrasebook & Dictionary. Lonely Planet.

Saturday 19 to Sunday 20 and Saturday 26 to Sunday 27 March

This is a 4-day spring course split across two weekends that will be held online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

GODS, TEMPLES, AND PALACES: AN OVERVIEW OF MESOAMERICAN ARCHITECTURE

Course Director: Dr Elizabeth Baquedano (University College London)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

We are pleased to welcome back Elizabeth Baquedano who will guide you on an exploration of the extraordinary temple and palace architecture of Mesoamerica. Learn about the pantheon of deities worshipped, for example in Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan - the axis mundi of the city - dedicated to the gods of rain (Tlaloc) and war (Huitzilopochtli). You will explore evidence for daily life in royal palace contexts as well as the elaborate art and memorial architecture commissioned by Maya kings and queens.

This course offers the rare opportunity to study religious and residential Mesoamerican architecture alongside important archaeological finds including painting and sculpture ranging from the Formative Period (c.500–350 BCE) to the destruction of the most important temple of the Aztecs, the Templo Mayor in 1521 CE.

Course Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £220 per person
Recommended reading

Miller, M. and Taube. K. (1993) An Illustrated Dictionary of The Gods and Symbols of Ancient Mexico and the Maya. Thames and Hudson.
Miller, M. (2014) Maya Art and Architecture. Thames and Hudson.
Carballo, D. M. (2007) Effigy Vessels, Religious Integration, and the Origins of the Central Mexican Pantheon. Ancient Mesoamerica 18: 53–67.
Evans, S. T. (2013) Ancient Mexico and Central America. Thames and Hudson.
Evans, S. T. and Pillsbury, J. (2004) Palaces of the Ancient New World. Harvard University Press.
López Austin, A., López Luján, L., and Sugiyama, S. (1991) The Temple of Quetzalcoatl at Teotihuacan: Its possible ideological significance. Ancient Mesoamerica 2(1): 93–105.

Saturday 28 to Sunday 29 May

This is a 2-day spring course that will be held online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

INTRODUCTION TO OLD PERSIAN: THE LANGUAGE AND SCRIPT OF THE ACHAEMENIDS

Course Co-Directors: Prof. Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones and Mr Jack Neighbour (both University of Cardiff)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

In 522 BCE, Darius I usurped the Persian throne and enacted a bureaucratic overhaul of his empire that was epitomised in grandiose building projects like those seen at Persepolis and Bisotun. Such extravagancies pertained to the Achaemenid wealth and power, and signified a Persian rebranding of near eastern imperial administration. An empire woven of Persian cloth would need a language to match, and so Darius employed a new monumental script – Old Persian.

Join us in exploring the historical and linguistic context of Old Persian, learning the basics of Old Persian grammar and translation with assisted reading of original Achaemenid texts and more.

This course assumes you have no prior experience in the subject.

Course Co-Director info Course Co-Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £110 per person
Recommended reading

Briant, P. (2002) From Cyrus to Alexander: A history of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns.
– Chapters 3 and 5 provide some historical contexts to Darius and his inscriptions.
Root, M. C. (1979) The King and Kingship in Achaemenid Art: Essays on the creation of an iconography of empire. Brill.
Skjærvø, P. O. (2002) An Introduction to Old Persian. Self-published.
– Lesson 1 contains a useful glossary of common Old Persian words.
Vaan, M. A. C. de and Lubotsky, A. M. (2011) Old Persian. In Gzella, H. (ed.) Languages from the World of the Bible, 194–208.
– pages 194–195 provide introduction to language and sources.

Saturday 28 to Sunday 29 May

This is a 2-day spring course that will be held online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

THE OBELISKS OF THE CAESARS: A READING CLASS OF ROMAN HIEROGLYPHS

Course Director: Dr Luigi Prada (Uppsala University)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

Last year, BSS offered its first online course on Graeco-Roman hieroglyphic texts. Following its success, this weekend course will offer participants the opportunity to continue exploring a selection of fascinating texts from the period. Namely, we will read in extenso the inscriptions of a group of obelisks erected by order of a number of Roman emperors, which contain some of the latest and arguably most original hieroglyphic inscriptions from Egyptian antiquity, dating to the first and second centuries CE. The inscriptions will be analysed in detail in terms of their grammar, palaeography, as well as their content, placing them into the historical context of the interaction between ancient Egypt and imperial Rome.

NB: This class is not intended for beginners. Participants will be expected to have a knowledge of hieroglyphic Middle Egyptian to the level of the BSS "Reading Hieroglyphs” course, though they are not necessarily expected to have attended last year’s “Cleopatra’s Hieroglyphs” course.

Course Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £110 per person
Recommended reading

There is no complete English reference grammar or sign-list for Graeco-Roman hieroglyphic texts. All the necessary teaching material will be provided by the Course Director.

If they so choose, students can familiarise themselves with the topic through the following titles (NB: these also include studies relevant to the wider context of written culture in Graeco-Roman Egypt, and not specifically focused on linguistic / philological problems):

Bowman, A. K. (1986 and following re-editions) Egypt after the Pharaohs: 332 BC–AD 642: From Alexander to the Arab conquest. British Museum.
Engsheden, A. (2016) Traditional Egyptian II (Ptolemaic, Roman). In Stauder-Porchet, J., Stauder, A., and Wendrich, W. (eds), UCLA Encyclopedia of Egyptology. UCLA.
– Freely available online here.
Fairman, H. W. (1945) An Introduction to the Study of Ptolemaic Signs and Their Values. Le Bulletin de l’Institut français d’archéologie orientale 43: 51–138.
– Freely available online here.
Hill, M. (2016) Egypt in the Ptolemaic Period. In Heilbrunn Timeline of Art History. The Metropolitan Museum of Art.
– Freely available online here.
Kurth, D. (2010) A Ptolemaic Sign-list: Hieroglyphs used in the temples of the Graeco-Roman Period of Egypt. Backe-Verlag.
Prada, L. (2018) Multilingualism Along the Nile. In The Getty Iris Blog. J. Paul Getty Trust.
– Freely available online here.
Riggs, C. (ed.) (2012) The Oxford Handbook of Roman Egypt. Oxford University Press.
Wilson, P. (1997) A Ptolemaic Lexikon: A lexicographical study of the Ptolemaic texts in the temple of Edfu. Peeters.

Monday 13 to Friday 17 June

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

READING COPTIC: WORDS OF WORLDLY WISDOM

Course Director: Dr Bill Manley (University of Glasgow)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

Our brand-new course for old friends and newcomers alike is designed to build on your skills in reading Coptic and develop your appreciation of Egyptian culture. As ever, you will be invited to study different aspects of the language and apply them in reading ancient texts using notes specially written for BSS. This time we will concentrate on two collections of texts which may seem like old friends themselves. The sermons of Apa Shenoute and the sayings of the Desert Fathers, written down at the end of Roman rule, are part of the foundations for understanding the history and culture of the early Copts as well as appreciating the standard Sahidic form of their language.

NB: You need not have taken the introductory course 'Coptic: A course for beginners' at BSS, but 'Reading Coptic' assumes you do have some experience in reading Coptic texts. As a rule of thumb, you should be able to read a short narrative including the past tense and circumstantial forms. However, do not worry about the intensity: there will be plenty of time for supervised practice and for questions and answers with your tutor.

If you have taken 'Reading Coptic' with us previously, you will find all-new content in this latest course

Course Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

The following books are not essential, but you may find it helpful to bring a copy with you, if you happen to have one;
Cannuyer, C. (2001) Coptic Egypt: The Christians of the Nile. Thames and Hudson.
Smith, R. (1993) A Concise Coptic-English Lexicon. Scholars Press, Atlanta.
Ward, B. (2003) The Desert Fathers: Sayings of the early Christian monks. Penguin Classics.

Monday 20 to Friday 24 June

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

BEGINNING HIEROGLYPHS

Course Director: Dr Bill Manley (University of Glasgow)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

We are excited to bring back our popular beginning hieroglyphs course this year. Our Course Director has vast experience of the subject and is regarded as one of the best hieroglyphs teachers around. The course itself is a unique introduction to the world of Egyptian hieroglyphs specially written for BSS and requires no prior experience of the subject. Through a series of presentations and practical sessions, you will progress from the basics of Egyptian hieroglyphic writing to learning the language of the ancient Egyptians — and do so from day one by reading ancient monuments available online or on display in world-famous museum collections.

This course is specifically intended for complete beginners but may well appeal to anyone wishing to refresh their knowledge of hieroglyphs, too. It has always proved to be an intense and rewarding experience.

Course Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

NB: It is essential that you bring with you, right from the start, a copy of;
Collier, M. and Manley, B. How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs. British Museum Press (ideally the 2003 revised edition, but the earlier edition is fine).

Monday 20 to Friday 24 June

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held in person. Also online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

HIERATIC: AN INTRODUCTION TO ANCIENT EGYPT'S CURSIVE SCRIPT

Course Director: Dr Luigi Prada (Uppsala University)

This course will be delivered in person and online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

As surprising as it may seem to us, the scribes of ancient Egypt first learned to write and read their language not in the hieroglyphic script, but in its cursive kindred: hieratic. Knowledge of hieroglyphs would come only at a more advanced stage. However, for the modern student the opposite is true; all of us typically start learning ancient Egyptian through the hieroglyphic script.

This course thus provides you with the unique opportunity to read ancient Egypt's literary masterworks and daily-life documents in their original hieratic version, written on papyri, ostraca, and other materials. Following an introduction to hieratic and its essential elements, a selection of texts will be read in class, offering you an overview of the diachronic evolution of the hieratic script from early Pharaonic to Graeco-Roman times. This course includes sessions taught with original artefacts at the British Museum and the UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology.

NB: Participants will be expected to have knowledge of hieroglyphic Middle Egyptian to the level of the BSS 'Reading Hieroglyphs' course. Should you be uncertain as to your knowledge level, contact the Course Director by email to discuss your case.

Course Director info Timetable
In person Course Fee: £350 per person
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

This course is based on handouts specially prepared for BSS. The Course Director will provide the necessary teaching material. The standard reference for hieratic signs is:
Möller, G. (1909–1936) Hieratische Paläographie. Bd. I–IV. Hinrichs. Online PDFs are available here.

Monday 20 to Friday 24 June

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held in person. Also online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

20,000 YEARS OF AGRICULTURAL AND CLIMATE CHANGE IN NORTH AFRICA AND THE LEVANT

Course Director: Dr Claire Malleson (American University of Beirut)

This course will be delivered in person and online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

This course will explore the most important aspect of life for the survival of the human species – farming, and its relationship to the environment and climate change. Starting with current ideas about ‘hunter gatherer' lifestyles in northeast Africa and western Asia, we will then examine evidence for the process of the gradual shift to formal farming lifestyles across the region.

The course will also cover specific case studies for the Bronze Age agricultural systems that supported the rise of the 'Great Civilisations' in Egypt and the Levant. You will gain unique insight into this topic through discussions and activities based on traditional sources (art, architecture, and texts), as well as the natural sciences (botany, zoology, climatology, and geology).

Course Director info Timetable
In person Course Fee: £350 per person
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

Malleson, C. (2020) Flora of Ancient Egypt. In Shaw, I. and Bloxam, E. (eds), The Oxford Handbook of Egyptology. Oxford University Press, 125–150.
Miller, N. (2018) Adaptation and Change: The development of agriculture in the ancient Middle East. Expedition: The magazine of the University of Pennsylvania. 60(1): 36–41.
What was the Neolithic Agricultural Revolution? National Geographic (April 2019).
Evidence of Ancient Farming in Iran Discovered. Live Science (July 2013).
Let's Go Wild: How ancient communities resisted new farming practices. University of Cambridge News (January 2016).

Online resources
Sickles and farming in Egypt.
Funerary models.
Farming scenes in the tomb of Menna.

Monday 27 June to Friday 1 July

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held in person. Also online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

READING HIEROGLYPHS: SONGS FOR ALL TIME

Course Co-Directors: Dr José-Ramón Pérez-Accino (Complutense University of Madrid) and Dr Bill Manley (University of Glasgow)

This course will be delivered in person and online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

As usual we have set aside a course for those of you who love to experience the culture of pharaonic Egypt up close — by reading the ancient texts. Once again, we are delighted to offer a brand-new course, this time exploring the language of various songs and lyrics. In particular, we will look at the celebrated collection of love songs found among the Chester Beatty archive from Deir el-Medina, as well as hymns and lyrics from other archaeological contexts, including the 'Songs of the Harper'.

NB: In response to ever-increasing demand for our 'Reading Hieroglyphs' courses, 'Songs for all time' will run in two parallel groups to allow for smaller class sizes. One group will run online but we hope the other group can run in person in our London classrooms. Nevertheless, the content of the course will be the same for each group.

Our 'Reading Hieroglyphs' courses assume you already have a good reading knowledge of Egyptian hieroglyphic texts. Normally we expect you to have taken both of the BSS courses 'Hieroglyphs for Beginners' (first stage) and 'Hieroglyphs: The next step' (second stage) beforehand. As a rule of thumb, before you come along you should be comfortable reading all the texts in How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs (see Recommended reading). However, do not worry about the intensity of this course: throughout the week there will be plenty of time for your own work and for questions and answers with your tutors.

Course Co-Director info Course Co-Director info Timetable
In person Course Fee: £350 per person
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

The course is based on handouts specially prepared for BSS. However, we prefer that you bring a copy of the following with you:
Collier, M. and Manley, B. (1998 or 2003 edition) How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs. British Museum Press.

If you have a copy of an ancient Egyptian dictionary, you will find it useful at BSS but not essential. We recommend:
Faulkner, R. O. (1962) A Concise Dictionary of Middle Egyptian. Griffith Institute.

Monday 27 June to Friday 1 July

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held in person.

STONE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES IN ANCIENT EGYPT

Course Co-Directors: Dr Sarah Doherty (University of Oxford) and Mr Matt Szafran (Independent)

This course will be delivered in person only.

We are thrilled to welcome the ancient technologist double act of Doherty and Szafran! In this course, they will draw on the results of their own experimental archaeological research to demonstrate the different ways in which ancient Egyptians worked stone. You will learn about different stone types, uses, significance, and the tools required to work them – particularly stone tools but also copper and bronze. You will become familiar with the workshops, tools, and trades (and attitudes towards them) of ancient Egypt.

You will also learn how to use your newly acquired knowledge of these processes to find toolmarks and uncover stories on original artefacts through sessions taught at the British Museum and the UCL Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology. This course also features a guest lecture from Dr Campbell Price on the prestige of stone as a material and its applications in sculpture.

Recommended reading

Lucas, A. and Harris, J. (2012 [1948]) Ancient Egyptian Materials and Industries. Courier Corporation.
Nicholson, P. and Shaw, I. (2000) Ancient Egyptian Materials and Technology. Cambridge University Press.
Scheel, B. (1998) Egyptian Metalworking and Tools (Shire Egyptology). Shire Publications.
Stocks, D. A. (2003) Experiments in Egyptian Archaeology: Stoneworking technology in ancient Egypt. Routledge.
Weissberg, S. and Bleiberg, E. (2019) Striking Power: Iconoclasm in ancient Egypt. ‎Pulitzer Foundation.
Petrie, W. M. F. (1917) Tools and Weapons: Illustrated by the Egyptian collection in University College, London, and 2,000 outlines from other sources. Bernard Quaritch.

Monday 4 to Friday 8 July

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held in person. Also online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

PROPHETS AND PROPHECY IN THE HEBREW BIBLE AND THE NEAR EAST

Course Director: Prof. Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones (University of Cardiff)

This course will be delivered in person and online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

Prophecy was a widespread phenomenon, not only in ancient Israel but throughout the ancient Near East as a whole. This fascinating and lively course explores ancient Near Eastern and biblical notions of prophets, prophetic words, and prophetic activities. The oracles and prophets from ancient Mesopotamia, the Levant, and the Iranian world from the second and first millennia BCE will be our focus, although special attention will be given to the prophecies of Isaiah — one of the most remarkable books of the Hebrew Bible, covering a period of around 300 years and dealing with three successive empires: Assyria, Babylon, and Persia.

All texts are studied in English translation.

Course Director info Timetable
In person Course Fee: £350 per person
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

Abernethy, A. T. (2021) Discovering Isaiah: Content, interpretation, reception. William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company.
Kriwaczek, P. (2002) In Search of Zarathustra: The first Prophet and the ideas that changed the world. Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
McEntire, M. (2015) A Chorus of Prophetic Voices: Introducing the prophetic literature of ancient Israel. Westminster John Knox Press.
Oswalt, J. N. (2014) The Holy One of Israel: Studies in the Book of Isaiah. Wipf and Stock Publishers.
Nissinen, M. (2003) Prophets and Prophecy in the Ancient Near East. Society of Biblical Literature.
Nissinen, M. (2017) Ancient Prophecy: Near Eastern, biblical, and Greek perspectives. Oxford University Press.

Online resources

State Archives of Assyria.
Bible Study tools: Isaiah.

Monday 4 to Friday 8 July

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held in person. Also online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

TUTANKHAMUN: HIS LIFE AND AFTERLIVES

Course Director: Prof. Aidan Dodson (University of Bristol)

This course will be delivered in person and online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

Despite its short duration, Tutankhamun's life witnessed key parts of one of the most momentous events in ancient Egyptian history: the religious and artistic revolution of Akhenaten, and the onset of the counter-reformation that brought it to an end. Then, after millennia of oblivion, his existence was once again noticed at the end of the 1820s and ideas developed as to his role in history – before bursting forth onto the international scene through the discovery of his tomb in 1922. This course will explore all these aspects of his career(s).

Course Director info Timetable
In person Course Fee: £350 per person
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

Carter, H. and Mace, A. C. (1923–1933) The Tomb of Tut∙ankh∙Amen. 3 vols. Cassell.
Darnell, J. C. and Manassa, C. (2007) Tutankhamun's Armies: Battle and conquest during ancient Egypt's late 18th Dynasty. John Wiley & Sons.
Dodson, A. (2016 [1989]) Amarna Sunrise: Egypt from Golden Age to age of heresy. AUC Press.
Dodson, A. (2018 [2010]) Amarna Sunset: Nefertiti, Tutankhamun, Ay, Horemheb, and the Egyptian counter-reformation. AUC Press.
Dodson, A. (2020) Nefertiti, Queen and Pharaoh of Egypt: Her life and afterlife. AUC Press.
Eaton-Krauss, M. (2016) The Unknown Tutankhamun. Bloomsbury.

Online resources

Tutankhamun: Anatomy of an Excavation. The Griffith Institute.

Monday 11 to Friday 15 July

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held in person. Also online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

GREATER NUBIA: EXPLORING THE LAND AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE MIDDLE NILE VALLEY

Course Co-Directors: Dr Robert Morkot (Friends of the Petrie Museum) and Dr Iwona Kozieradzka-Ogunmakin (University of Exeter)

This course will be delivered in person and online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

Nubia – the land stretching between the southern part of Egypt and the confluence of the White and Blue Niles in central Sudan – encompasses environmentally-diverse and culturally-rich regions. In the past and despite being a birthplace to one of the greatest African civilisations – Kerma culture and Kush – Nubia was seen by archaeologists merely as a conduit, a ‘corridor' connecting Egypt to ‘sub-Saharan' Africa.

This course will present new research that re-evaluates previous ideas concerning Nubia, its role and importance in antiquity, with the focus on the extent of its cultural connections (north-south and east-west) and changing landscapes that impacted on the animals, peoples, and cultures.

Course Co-Director info Course Co-Director info Timetable
In person Course Fee: £350 per person
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

Edwards, D. (2004) The Nubian Past: An archaeology of Sudan. Routledge.
El-Tayeb, M. and Czyżewska-Zalewska, E. (eds) (2021) Early Makuria Research Project: El-Zuma cemetery. 3 vols. Brill.
Emberling, G. and Williams, B. (eds) (2021) The Oxford Handbook of Ancient Nubia. Oxford University Press.
Fisher, M. M., Lacovara, P., Ikram, S., and D'Auria, S. (eds) (2012) Ancient Nubia: African kingdoms on the Nile. AUC Press.
Morkot, R. G. (2000) The Black Pharaohs: Egypt's Nubian rulers. Rubicon Press.
Raue, D. (ed.) (2019) Handbook of Ancient Nubia. De Gruyter.
Spencer, N., Stevens, A., and Binder, M. (2012) Amara West: Living in Egyptian Nubia. The Trustees of the British Museum.
Smith, S. T. (2003) Wretched Kush: Ethnic identities and boundaries in Egypt's Nubian empire. Routledge.

Online resources

Sudan & Nubia (Issues 1–24), the periodical of the Sudan Archaeological Research Society (SARS) are available online. The articles cover aspects of archaeology and current excavations, and are well-illustrated.
Older volumes of excavation memoirs in English and French and the journal Kush are available online via the French Archaeological Unit in Khartoum.
Hamadab 3D. A pdf booklet about the site and research is available in the Downloads section.
Amara West.
Musawwarat Es-Sufra.
Meroë Pyramids.
The Jebel Moya Project.

Monday 11 to Friday 15 July

This is a 5-day summer course that will be held online via Zoom
- video recordings will be available afterwards.

MAKE A JOYFUL NOISE:
HYMNS AND WORSHIP IN THE ANCIENT NEAR EAST AND THE HEBREW BIBLE

Course Director: Prof. Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones (University of Cardiff)

This course will be delivered online via the video communication platform Zoom (details provided upon enrolment).

Our term ‘hymn’ stems from the Greek ‘hymnos’, referring to songs sung in ritual contexts. Hymns are well attested in Ancient Near Eastern religious literature and are primarily characterised by their effusive praise for either a human sovereign or a deity, though hymns written in honour of even non-anthropomorphic subjects, such as cities and temples are known. As "songs to the gods", hymns were the prime vehicle through which ancient peoples eternalised and transmitted their thoughts. These could be solo expressions of faith or communal outpourings of devotion, but what links them together is the performative aspect inherent in the genre. This fascinating and lively course looks at the hymnic traditions of antiquity and explores such themes as music, dance, singing, theology, ritual, and compositions. Hymns of praise, of lamentation, of celebration, and of war will be encountered and special attention will be given to the richest surviving collection of hymns from antiquity: the Hebrew psalms.

Course Co-Director info Timetable
Online Course Fee: £270 per person
Recommended reading

Alter, R. (2009) The Book of Psalms: A translation with commentary. New York.
Brueggemann, W. (2014) Psalms. Cambridge.
Forster, B. (2005) Before the Muses: An anthology of Akkadian literature. Yale.
Foster, J. (1995) Hymns, Prayers, and Songs: An anthology of ancient Egyptian lyric poetry. Atlanta.
Gunkel, H. (1998) Introduction to Psalms: The genres of the religious lyric of Israel. Eugene.
Keel, O. (2018) Symbolism of the Biblical World: Ancient Near Eastern iconography and the Book of Psalms. Winona Lake.
Lenzi, A. (2011) Akkadian Prayers and Hymns: A reader. Atlanta.
Powell, B. (2021) Greek Poems to the Gods: Hymns from Homer to Proclus. London.
Smith, A. R. (2020) Music in Religious Cults of the Ancient Near East. London.